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Requirements for Airborne Vector Gravimetry

  • K. P. Schwarz
  • O. Colombo
  • G. Hein
  • E. T. Knickmeyer
Part of the International Association of Geodesy Symposia book series (IAG SYMPOSIA, volume 110)

Abstract

The objective of airborne vector gravimetry is the determination of the full gravity disturbance vector along the aircraft trajectory. The paper briefly outlines the concept of this method using a combination of inertial and GPS-satellite data. The accuracy requirements for users in geodesy and solid earth geophysics, oceanography and exploration geophysics are then specified. Using these requirements, accuracy specifications for the GPS subsystem and the INS subsystem are developed. The integration of the subsystems and the problems connected with it are briefly discussed and operational methods are indicated that might reduce some of the stringent accuracy requirements.

Keywords

Inertial Navigation System Gravity Disturbance Airborne Gravimetry Gyro Drift Aircraft Trajectory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. P. Schwarz
    • 1
  • O. Colombo
    • 2
  • G. Hein
    • 3
  • E. T. Knickmeyer
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Surveying EngineeringThe University of CalgaryCanada
  2. 2.NASA Goddard S.F.CGreenbeltUSA
  3. 3.Astronomical and Physical GeodesyFAFGermany
  4. 4.Nortech Surveys (Canada) Inc.CalgaryCanada
  5. 5.Institute of Flight Guidance and ControlTechnical University of BraunschweigGermany

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