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Biophysical Evaluation of the Fetus

  • Chin-Chu Lin
  • Zubie Sheikh

Abstract

Antepartum evaluation of fetal well-being has been the focus of research and practice in maternal-fetal medicine for the past several decades. The extent of research in this field is reflected in the wide spectrum of tests that have been applied to the antepartum evaluation of the fetus. These include the time-honored measurement of fundal height, amniocentesis in Rh sensitization, amnioscopy to detect meconium-stained amniotic fluid, fetoscopy, maternal biochemical testing, estriol, human placental lactogen (HPL), and progesterones. During the past decade, biophysical assessment, Doppler velocimetry, and, more recently, invasive cordocentesis have been added to this list.

Keywords

Obstet Gynecol Fetal Heart Rate Fetal Movement Amniotic Fluid Index Amniotic Fluid Volume 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chin-Chu Lin
  • Zubie Sheikh

There are no affiliations available

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