Substance Abuse

  • James S. Ketchum
  • J. Thomas Ungerleider

Abstract

In the third of a century since Dr L Jolyon West first made his interest in abusable substances known to readers of the psychiatric and medical literature, he has, along with the rest of us, seen the profile and dimensions of this kaleidoscopic field change many times. Not only has the number of substances changed, but their physical and chemical features, their availability, their unsuspected consequences, the forces promoting and discouraging their use, and their place on the national agenda also have changed. Some have changed in predictable ways, and others in ways that could not have been foreseeable.

Keywords

Dopamine Schizophrenia Cocaine Indole Arena 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • James S. Ketchum
  • J. Thomas Ungerleider

There are no affiliations available

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