The Role of Theory in the Examination of Relationship Loss

  • Steve Duck

Abstract

Despite the momentous human tragedies played out in the loss of relationships throughout recorded (and probably unrecorded) time, scholarly work on the topic was limited until the decade of the 1980s opened up a more general interest (Baxter, 1984; Baxter & Philpott, 1980; Lee, 1984; Metts, Cupach, & Bejlovec, 1989). Earlier work invariably focused only on divorce, and the first scholarly book devoted entirely to the general topic of dissolving personal relationships was not published until 1982 (Duck, 1982).

Keywords

Steam Posit Metaphor Folk Undercut 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steve Duck

There are no affiliations available

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