Mastering Change

  • Louis M. Abbey
Part of the Computers in Health Care book series (HI)

Abstract

Virtually everything we do in dentistry that involves research, teaching, administration or patient care is based on generation, storage and manipulation of information (information management). The current paradigm for managing information in dentistry, as in most health care, is human memory backed by printed or written information stored in books or journals. We distribute and communicate information via printed or verbal channels.

Keywords

Income Penicillin Assure Expense Arena 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louis M. Abbey

There are no affiliations available

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