Psychosocial Characteristics of Learning Disabled Students

  • Ruth Pearl
Part of the Disorders of Human Learning, Behavior, and Communication book series (HUMAN LEARNING)

Abstract

The scope of research on learning disabilities has broadened over the past 15 years to include the examination of psychosocial characteristics of individuals with learning disabilities. This attention to the social characteristics of students whose presenting problem is presumably in the academic domain is not surprising. It is now generally accepted that students’ self-perceptions, the quality and quantity of their social experiences, and other psychosocial concerns in some way may be significant among the complex set of factors that are involved in the manifestation of a learning disability.

Keywords

Depression Toll 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth Pearl

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