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Treatments of Self-injury Based on Teaching Compliance and/or Brief Physical Restraint

  • Ron Van Houten
  • Ahmos Rolider
  • Mike Houlihan
Part of the Disorders of Human Learning, Behavior, and Communication book series (HUMAN LEARNING)

Abstract

Several of the treatment approaches employed to treat self-injury involve the use of brief, contingent physical restraint. Some of these procedures have as an integral part the requirement that the person receiving treatment also comply with commands given by the therapist. All of these procedures involve the use of physical intervention because the therapist needs to physically restrain or prompt a behavior contingent upon self-injurious behavior (SIB).

Keywords

Target Behavior Apply Behavior Analysis Physical Restraint Negative Side Effect Mental Deficiency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ron Van Houten
  • Ahmos Rolider
  • Mike Houlihan

There are no affiliations available

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