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Adolescence and Community Adjustment

  • Laraine Masters Glidden
  • Andrea G. Zetlin
Part of the Disorders of Human Learning, Behavior, and Communication book series (HUMAN LEARNING)

Abstract

Adolescence is frequently conceptualized as a transitional stage, as a bridge between the emotional and economic dependency of childhood and the autonomy and independence orientation of adulthood. Although this notion of transition is reasonable, it should not lead to the mistaken belief that what occurs during adolescence is unimportant, or no different in kind from what occurs during other developmental periods of the life span. In Western industrialized societies especially, adolescence is a rather lengthy period of preparation wherein the man or woman child is given the opportunity to try on and train for the various roles of adulthood (Hopkins, 1983, p. 9).

Keywords

Mental Retardation Down Syndrome Mental Deficiency Exceptional Child Moderate Mental Retardation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laraine Masters Glidden
  • Andrea G. Zetlin

There are no affiliations available

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