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Marsileaceae Mirbel

Genera 221–223
  • Alice F. Tryon
  • Bernard Lugardon

Abstract

A small family of three genera that occur in seasonally wet or aquatic habitats. The genera are widely distributed and disjunct except for Regnellidium, which is localized in southern Brazil and adjacent areas. The trilete spores are heterosporous and are enveloped by special episporal layers. The exospore is of the blechnoid type. The microspores are spheroidal, with a plain, papillate, or rugulate exospore below a densely folded epispore. The megaspores have a plain to slightly undulate exospore below a complex epispore.

Keywords

Spore Wall General Literature Wall Section Distal Face Spore Mother Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alice F. Tryon
    • 1
  • Bernard Lugardon
    • 2
  1. 1.Herbarium, Department of BiologyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  2. 2.Biologie VégétaleUniversité Paul SabatierToulouseFrance

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