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The Development of a New Measuring Instrument

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Part of the Frontiers of Primary Care book series (PRIMARY)

Abstract

The goal of this chapter is to examine the measurement of patient functioning as an assessment problem. This will be accomplished by comparing this domain with a number of others, and outlining some of the features of patient functioning that mark it as unique. Such a comparative approach will render visible some of the basic issues, that confront any attempt to proceed with the measurement of patient functioning. So, too, does comparison with developments in other domains point to several methodological approaches that might be appropriate should WONCA decide to begin the process of measure development.

Keywords

Construct Validity Dimensional Structure Patient Functioning Wide Bandwidth Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1990

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