Health-Threatening Behaviors

  • James K. Luiselli
Part of the Disorders of Human Learning, Behavior, and Communication book series (HUMAN LEARNING)

Abstract

Health-threatening behaviors are those responses and life-style patterns that deleteriously affect physical well-being and establish risk for subsequent medical illness. Problems of this type are common within contemporary society: cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, poor exercise habits, and high-cholesterol diets. Intervention to reduce these and similar risk factors is a primary therapeutic goal within behavioral medicine. Such efforts are classified as secondary prevention (Luiselli, 1987; Masek, Epstein, & Russo, 1981).

Keywords

Fatigue Starch Schizophrenia Immobilization Drilling 

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • James K. Luiselli

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