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Ionic Factors Affecting Aluminum Transformations and the Impact on Soil and Environmental Sciences

  • P. M. Huang
Part of the Advances in Soil Science book series (SOIL, volume 8)

Abstract

Aluminum is the most abundant metallic element of minerals in soils and the associated environments. It occurs in a series of Al-bearing minerals (e.g., feldspars, micas, chlorites, vermiculites, smectites, kaolinite, halloysite, and gibbsite). It makes up 81, 82, 25, and 4 g kg-1 of igneous, shale, sandstone, and limestone rocks, respectively (Jackson, 1964; Brady, 1974; McLean, 1976).

Keywords

Humic Substance Fulvic Acid Aluminum Hydroxide Soil Science Society Precipitation Product 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

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  • P. M. Huang

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