Linguistic Competence and Level of Cognitive Functioning in Adults with Traumatic Closed Head Injury

  • Elisabeth H. Wiig
  • Elizabeth W. Alexander
  • Wayne Secord
Part of the Springer Series in Neuropsychology book series (SSNEUROPSYCHOL)

Abstract

In recent discussions and investigations of language and communication following traumatic head injury, the central issue has been whether (a) categorical linguistic deficits (e.g., aphasia, apraxia) result or (b) language becomes disorganized in a global disorganization process. This research reflects the global disorganization perspective. It was performed to test two hypotheses: first, that language impairments after traumatic closed head injury could be differentiated by measures on a formal test of linguistic competence and metalinguistic ability (Wiig & Secord, 1985); second, that the selected measures of linguistic competence would reflect ratings of level of cognitive functioning (Hagen, 1984).

Keywords

Covariance Kelly Doyle Metaphor Aphasia 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elisabeth H. Wiig
  • Elizabeth W. Alexander
  • Wayne Secord

There are no affiliations available

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