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Toward an Effective Policy for Handling Dangerous Juvenile Offenders

  • Jeffrey L. Bleich

Abstract

Over the past two decades statistics from various national crime-reporting services have focused media and public attention upon the problem of serious juvenile crime. The facts, by now, are familiar. American youth under 18 represent less than 14% of the population, but are responsible for one-quarter of all arrests for violent crime (murder, rape, aggravated assault, and robbery) (1982 Uniform Crime Reports). In 1981, the juvenile arrest rates for serious property crimes exceeded the adult rate by nearly 6:1 and the juvenile violent arrest rate doubled the adult rate. (1981 Uniform Crime Reports). Furthermore, the rate at which juveniles are arrested for violent crimes has been growing faster than the rate at which they are arrested for nonviolent crimes, and faster even than the rate at which adults are arrested for violent crimes (Wilson and Boland, 1978).

Keywords

Violent Crime Juvenile Justice Juvenile Offender Juvenile Justice System Juvenile Court 
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  • Jeffrey L. Bleich

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