Diffusion of Innovations: An Overview

  • Everett M. Rogers
Part of the Computers and Medicine book series (C+M)

Abstract

Undoubtedly the most influential investigation of the diffusion of a biomedical innovation was a study conducted by Coleman and others (1966) of the diffusion of an antibiotic drug among a community of physicians. The innovation spread from its introduction in an Illinois community to widespread adoption in about two years. At first only a few doctors tried the new antibiotic, then the rate of adoption took a spurt, and finally the rate of increase slowed to a point where only a few doctors had not adopted the antibiotic. The Coleman study identified the characteristics of the adopters of the innovation: generally the first doctors to adopt the new drug were typified by a higher income, a larger practice, and a more cosmopolitan scope in their travel and reading.

Keywords

Corn Income Kelly Medium Role 

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Copyright information

© MIT Press 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Everett M. Rogers

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