Pollen Competitive Ability in Maize Selection and Single Gene Analysis

  • E. Ottaviano
  • P. Sidoti
  • M. Villa
Conference paper

Abstract

Pollen competitive ability is one of the major components of gametophytic fitness; it depends mainly on germination time, tube growth rate and fertilization ability. The resulting gametophytic selection can produce significant evolutionary changes (1,2) and can be used to develop efficient methods of plant breeding (3,4,5).

Keywords

Starch Maize 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1).
    Mulcahy D.L. (1979) The rise of the Angiosperms: a genecological factor. Science, 206: 20–23.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2).
    Sari Gorla M., Frova C., and Ottaviano E. (1985). The extent of gametophytic-sporophytic gene expression in maize (in press).Google Scholar
  3. 3).
    Ottaviano E., Sari Gorla M. and Mulcahy D.L. (1980) Pollen tube growth rate in Zea mays; implications for genetic improvement of crops. Science, 210: 437–438.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4).
    Zamir D. (1983) Pollen gene expression and selection: applications in plant breeding. S.D. Tanksley and T.J. Orton (Eds), Isozymes in Plant Genetics and Breeding, part A: 313–329.Google Scholar
  5. 5).
    Mulcahy D.L. (1983) Manipulation of gametophytic populations. Efficiency in Plant Breeding. Lange W., Zeven A.C., Hogenboom N.G. (Eds). Pudoc Wageningen.Google Scholar
  6. 6).
    Sari Gorla M., Ottaviano E. and Faini D. (1975) Genetic variability of gametophytic growth rate in maize. Theor. Appl. Genetics, 46: 289–294.Google Scholar
  7. 7).
    Tanksley D.S., Zamir D. and Rick C.M. (1981) Evidence for extensive overlap of sporophytic and gametophytic gene expression in Licopersicon esculentum. Science, 213: 453–455.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8).
    Willing R.P. and Mascarenhas J.P. (1984) Analysis of complexity and diversity of mRNAs from pollen and shoots of Tradescantia. Plant Physiol., 75: 865–868.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9).
    Majodelo S.D.P., Groyan C. O., Servella P.A. (1966) Morphological expression of genetic male sterility in maize. Crop. Sci., 6: 379–380.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10).
    Mulcahy D.L. (1971) A correlation between gametophytic and sporophytic characteristics in Zea mays L. Science, 171: 1155–1156.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11).
    Ottaviano E., Sari Gorla M., and Pe E. (1982) Male gametophytic selection in maize. Theor.Appl.Genetics,63: 249–254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12).
    Ter-Avanesian P.V. (1978) The effect of varying the number of pollen grain used in fertilization. Theor. Appl. Genetics, 52: 77–79.Google Scholar
  13. 13).
    Ottaviano E. (1985) Male gametophytic selection in maize II (in press).Google Scholar
  14. 14).
    Bryce W.H., Nelson O.F.(1979) Starch-synthesizing enzymes in the endosperm and pollen of maize. Plant Physiol. 63:312.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15).
    Meinke D.W. (1982) Embryo-lethal mutants of Arabidopsis taliana: Evidence for gametophytic expression of mutant genes. Theor. Appl. Genetics 63: 381–386.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16).
    Coe E.H., Neuffer M.G. (1977) The genetic of corn. In Corn and Corn Improv. G.F. Sprague Ed. pp. 111–223. Am. Soc. Agr. Madison.Google Scholar
  17. 17).
    Manzocchi L.A., Daminati M.G., Gentinetta E., Salamini F. (1980) Viable defective endosperm mutants in maize I. Maydica XXY: 105–116.Google Scholar
  18. 18).
    Torti G., Lombardi L., Manzocchi L.A. (1984) Indole-3-acetic acid content in viable defective endosperm mutants of maize. Maydica XXIX: 335–343.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Ottaviano
    • 1
  • P. Sidoti
    • 1
  • M. Villa
    • 1
  1. 1.Sezione di Genetica e MicrobiologiaDipartimento di BiologiaMilanoItaly

Personalised recommendations