Pollen Selection Through Storage: A Tool for Improving True Potato Seed Quality?

  • N. Pallais
  • P. Malagamba
  • N. Fong
  • R. Garcia
  • P. Schmiediche
Conference paper

Abstract

Selection pressure applied to pollen may considerably alter the gene frequency in the following generation of the species in question. The principles of the Hardy-Weinberg Law do not hold true if there is selection pressure at the gametophytic level. Studies on pollen selection mechanisms have increased our understanding of Angiosperm evolution (Baker et al. 1983; Hoeckstra, 1983), and gametophytic selection has facilitated the achievement of breeding objectives (Ottaviano et al. 1982; Zamir et al. 1983).

Keywords

Maize Hydrated Editing Peru Phytol 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Pallais
  • P. Malagamba
  • N. Fong
  • R. Garcia
  • P. Schmiediche
    • 1
  1. 1.International Potato Center (CIP)LimaPeru

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