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Risks From Occupational and Dietary Exposure to Mevinphos

  • Roger C. Cochran
  • Tareq A. Formoli
  • Marilyn H. Silva
  • Thomas P. Kellner
  • Carolyn M. Lewis
  • Keith F. Pfeifer
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 146)

Abstract

Mevinphos (trade name Phosdrin®; 2-carbomethoxy-l-methyl-vinyl dimethyl phosphate; CAS# 7786-34-7) was originally developed by Shell Chemical in 1954. AMVAC Chemical Corporation purchased the chemical rights, and had four products containing mevinphos registered in California (Durham Duraphos® EM 4, Phosdrin® IPA 4, Phosdrin® 10.3 WS, and Phosdrin® 4 EC) in 1994. The technical formulation (Phosdrin® 10.3) consisted of 60% alpha isomer (E-mevinphos) and 40% beta isomer (Z-mevinphos) (Fig. 1). Product formulations consist of two different aqueous dilutions of the technical material, an organophosphate insecticide used to control aphids, mites, grasshoppers, cutworms, leafhoppers, caterpillars, and many other insects on a broad range of field, forage, vegetable, and fruit crops. More than 71,000 kg of mevinphos were sold in California in 1992 (DPR 1994). Reported applications involved a wide variety of crops for pest control as a “clean-up” prior to harvest. The principal uses in California in 1992 were for lettuce, broccoli, celery, and cauliflower (DPR 1994).

Keywords

Dietary Exposure Population Subgroup California Department Cholinergic Sign Ground Application 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roger C. Cochran
    • 1
  • Tareq A. Formoli
    • 1
  • Marilyn H. Silva
    • 1
  • Thomas P. Kellner
    • 1
  • Carolyn M. Lewis
    • 1
  • Keith F. Pfeifer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pesticide RegulationCalifornia Environmental Protection AgencySacramentoUSA

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