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β-Core Fragment: Structure, Production, Metabolism, and Clinical Utility

  • Glenn D. Braunstein
Conference paper
Part of the Serono Symposia USA book series (SERONOSYMP)

Abstract

The β-core fragment of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a biologically inactive, small molecular weight molecule composed of the core portion of hCGβ-subunit. The fragment appears to be a major degradation production of hCG and hCGβ metabolism and is found in large amounts in the urine of pregnant women and some patients with malignancies. Smaller quantities are found in the blood and urine of nonpregnant normal individuals and patients with benign disorders. This chapter presents a historical perspective concerning the discovery of this molecule and discusses its purification, structure, origin, and clinical applications.

Keywords

Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Core Fragment Metabolic Clearance Rate Pregnancy Urine Pregnancy Serum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Glenn D. Braunstein

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