Advertisement

Terrestrial CO2 Flux: The Challenge of Interdisciplinary Research

  • Virginia H. Dale
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 101)

Abstract

Land-use change is one of the major contributions to increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The interdisciplinary approach to addressing the carbon flux issue presented in this volume combines historical analysis, biomass estimates as provided by a geographic-information-systems model, bookkeeping models that track factors affecting the carbon flux, and evaluation of how economic factors affect tropical deforestation. The challenge of such interdisciplinary research is managing the research for the frequent communication necessary for research interactions and for developing and using interdisciplinary models.

Keywords

Carbon Flux Interdisciplinary Research Forest Biomass Global Carbon Cycle Tropical Deforestation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Allen, J. C., and Barnes, D. F. 1985. The causes of deforestation in developing countries, Annals of the Association of American Geographers 75 (2): 163–184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Anderson, A. B. 1990. Deforestation in Amazonia: Dynamics, causes and alternatives, pp. 3–23 in Anderson, A. B. (Ed.), Alternatives to Deforestation: Steps Toward Sustainable Use of the Amazon Rain Forest, Columbia University Press, New York.Google Scholar
  3. Behan, R. W. 1990. Multiresource forest management: a paradimatic challenge to professional forestry, Journal of Forestry 88 (4): 12–18.Google Scholar
  4. Brown et al. 1993. Land-use and biomass changes of forests in Peninsular Malaysia from 1972 to 1982: A GIS approach, Chap. 4 in Dale, V. H. (Ed.), The Effects of Land-Use Change on Atmospheric CO 2 Concentrations: South and Southeast Asia as a Case Study, Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  5. Clark, W. C. 1986. Sustainable development of the biosphere: Themes for a research program, pp. 5–49 in Clark, W. C., and Mann, R. E. (Eds.), Sustainable Development of the Biosphere, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  6. Dale, V. H.; Houghton, R. A.; and Hall, C. A. S. 1991. Estimating the effects of land-use change on global atmospheric CO2 concentrations, Canadian Journal of Forest Research 21: 87–90.Google Scholar
  7. Dale, V. H.; O’Neill, R. V.; and Southworth, F. Simulating land-use change in central Rondônia, Brazil, Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing (in press).Google Scholar
  8. Dale, V. H., et al. 1993. Estimating CO2 flux from tropical forests, Chap. 9 in Dale, V. H. (Ed.), The Effects of Land-Use Change on Atmospheric CO 2 Concentrations: South and Southeast Asia as a Case Study, Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  9. Detwiler, R. P., and Hall, C. A. S. 1988. Tropical forests and the global carbon cycle, Science 239: 42–47.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Flint, E. P., and Richards, J. F. 1993. Trends in carbon content of vegetation in South and Southeast Asia associated with changes in land use, Chap. 6 in Dale, V. H. (Ed.), The Effects of Land-Use Change on Atmospheric CO 2 Concentrations: South and Southeast Asia as a Case Study, Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  11. Gardner, R. H., and Turner, M. G. 1991. Future directions in quantitative landscape ecology, pp. 519–526 in Turner, M. G., and Gardner, R. H. (Eds.), Quantitative Methods in Landscape Ecology, Springer-Verlag, New York.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Graham, R L; Turner, M. G.; and Dale, V. H. 1990. Increasing atmospheric CO2 and climate change: Effects on forests, BioScience 40: 575–587.Google Scholar
  13. Hall, C. A. S., and Uhlig, J. S. 1990. Refining estimates of carbon released from tropical land use change, Canadian Journal of Forest Research 21: 118–131.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Hecht, S., and Cockburn, A. 1989. Fate of the Forests: Developers, Destroyers and Defenders of the Amazon, Verso, New York.Google Scholar
  15. Hornbeck, J. W., and Swank, W. T. 1992. Watershed ecosystem analysis as a basis for multiple-use management of eastern forests, Ecological Applications 2: 238–247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Houghton, R. A. 1992. Effects of land-use change, surface temperature, and CO2 concentration on terrestrial stores of carbon, Proceedings of the IPCC Workshop on Biotic Feedbacks in the Global Climate System,Woods Hole, Mass., Oct. 26–29, 1992 (in press).Google Scholar
  17. Houghton, R. A., and Hackler, J. L. 1993. The net flux of carbon from deforestation and degradation in South and Southeast Asia, Chap. 7 in Dale, V. H. (Ed.), Effects of Land Use Change on Atmospheric CO 2 Concentrations: Southeast Asia as a Case Study, Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  18. Houghton, R. A., and Skole, D. 1990. Changes in the global carbon cycle between 1700 and 1985, pp. 393–408 in Turner, B. L. (Ed.), The Earth Transformed by Human Action, Cambridge University Press, New York.Google Scholar
  19. Houghton, R. A., et al. 1983. Changes in the carbon content of terrestrial biota and soils between 1860 and 1980: Net release of CO2 to the atmosphere, Ecological Monographs 53: 235–262.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Houghton, R. A., et al. 1987. The flux of carbon from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere in 1980 due to changes in land use: Geographic distribution of the global flux, Tellus 39B: 122–139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Hurlbut, S. H. 1984. Pseudoreplication and the design of ecological field experiments, Ecological Monographs 54: 187–211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Irland, L. C. 1982. Wildlands and Woodlots: The Story of New England’s Forests, University Press of New England, Hanover, N.H.Google Scholar
  23. Iverson et al. 1993. Use of GIS for estimating potential and actual forest biomass for continental South and Southeast Asia, Chap. 3 in Dale, V. H. (Ed.), Effects of Land Use Change on Atmospheric CO 2 Concentrations: Southeast Asia as a Case Study, Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  24. Kessler, W. B., et al. 1992. New perspectives for sustainable natural resources management, Ecological Applications 2: 221–225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. King, A. W.; Emanuel, W. R.; and Post, W. M. 1992. Projecting future concentrations of atmospheric CO2 with global carbon cycle models: The importance of simulating historical changes, Environmental Management 16 (1): 91–108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Kummer, D. M. 1992. Measuring forest decline in the Philippines: An exercise in historiography, Forest and Conservation History 36 (4): 185–189.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Levin., S. 1992. Orchestrating environmental research and assessment, Ecological Applications 2 (2): 103–106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Likens, G. E. 1993. The Ecosystem Concept: Its Use and Abuse,Ecology Institute, OldendorfLuhe, Germany (in press).Google Scholar
  29. Marland, G., et al. 1989. Estimates of CO 2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Burning and Cement Manufacturing, Based on the United Nations Energy Statistics and the U.S. Bureau of Mines Cement Manufacturing Data, ORNL/CDIAC-25, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn.Google Scholar
  30. Noss, R.G. 1983.A regional landscape approach to maintain diversityBioScience 33:700–706.Google Scholar
  31. Parks, P. 1993. Economic reasons for forest land-use change: Relevance to tropical deforestation and the carbon cycle, Chap. 8 in Dale, V. H. (Ed.), The Effects of Land-Use Change on Atmospheric CO 2 Concentrations: South and Southeast Asia as a Case Study, Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  32. Peters, R. L., and Lovejoy, T. E. (Eds.) 1992. Global Warming and Biological Diversity, Yale University Press, New Haven, Conn.Google Scholar
  33. Post, W. M., et al. 1990. The global carbon cycle, American Scientist 78: 310–326.Google Scholar
  34. Richards, J. F., and Flint, E. P. 1993. A century of land-use change in South and Southeast Asia, Chap. 2 in Dale, V. H. (Ed.), The Effects of Land-Use Change on Atmospheric CO 2 Concentrations: South and Southeast Asia as a Case Study, Springer-Verlag, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  35. Richards, J. F., and Tucker, R. P. (Eds.) 1988. World Deforestation in the Twentieth Century, Duke University Press, Durham, N.C.Google Scholar
  36. Southworth, F.; Dale, V. H.; and O’Neill, R. V. 1991. Contrasting patterns of land use in Rondônia, Brazil: Simulating the effects on carbon release, International Social Sciences Journal 130: 681–698.Google Scholar
  37. Uhlig et al. 1993. Changing patterns in shifting cultivation in selected countries in Southeast Asia and their effect on the global carbon cycle, Chap. 5 in Dale, V. H. (Ed.), The Effects of Land-Use Change on Atmospheric CO 2 Concentrations: South and Southeast Asia as a Case Study, Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  38. Williams, M. 1982. Clearing the United States forests: Pivotal years 1810–1860, Journal of Historical Geography 8 (1): 12–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Virginia H. Dale
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Sciences DivisionOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA

Personalised recommendations