A Consideration of Stretch and Vibration Data in Relation to the Tonic Stretch Reflex

  • S. Grillner
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 7)

Abstract

The primary endings of the muscle spindle have for a long period of time been regarded as the main source of autogenetic excitation in tonic and phasic stretch reflexes. This idea has been questioned since 1969, and it has been suggested that the secondaries play the main role in tonic reflexes. An account is given of the different arguments for and against the secondary endings being the main source for excitation in the stretch reflex.

Keywords

Stein Procaine Prepar 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Grillner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of GöteborgGöteborgSweden

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