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Motor Control pp 139-145 | Cite as

Control of Motor Activity at the Thalamic Level of the Cat

  • L. Ángyán
  • L. Lénárd
  • K. Lissák

Abstract

A number of studies have convincingly shown that certain thalamic nuclei are somehow involved in the neural organization of motor behavior.The experimental analysis of complex motor mechanisms at the thalamic level seems to be important considering that co-ordinated complex locomotor patterns - resembling the normal motor activities of the animal - can be elicited by electrical stimulation only at the mesodiencephalic level (Waller, 1940; Hunter and Jasper, 1949; Hess, 1957; Doty, 1961; Koella, 1962; Delgado, 1964; Grastyán, Czopf, Ángyán and Szabó, 1965). In a series of previous experiments using electrical stimulation and different behavioral techniques, characteristic differences were found in the functioning of the anterior and posterior groups of nonspecific thalamic nuclei (Ángyán and Grastyán, 1965; Grastyán and Ángyán, 1967). The aim of the present study was to obtain further information about the role of thalamic nuclei especially in the initiation and performance of a complex locomotor task.

Keywords

Electrical Stimulation Conditioned Stimulus Thalamic Nucleus Thalamic Lesion Dorsomedial Nucleus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Ángyán
    • 1
  • L. Lénárd
    • 1
  • K. Lissák
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of physiologyUniv.Med.Sch.PécsHungary

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