Factors Influencing the Specificity of Voluntary Cardiovascular Control

  • Jasper Brener

Abstract

The recent prolific growth in the literature relating to learned control of cardiovascular and other internal activities has not been paralleled by an equivalent growth in the theoretical or conceptual superstructure relating to these phenomena. Although the phenomena reported in this literature may be described by existing theories of learned control, the resultant assimilation leaves much to be desired. This is true in terms of a conceptual clarification of the processes of learned control in general, and specifically with respect to the processes involved in learned modification of what have hitherto been considered to be reflexively organized vegetative functions. The primary intent of this chapter is to describe a theoretical appreciation of the processes of voluntary cardiovascular activity with special reference to the role of feedback in the development of differentiated control.

Keywords

Respiration Assimilation Hull Dial Clarification 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jasper Brener
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of HullYorkshireEngland

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