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IQ

  • Norman Miller
  • Merle Linda Zabrack
Chapter
  • 38 Downloads
Part of the Perspectives in Social Psychology book series (PSPS)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the measures of intelligence used in the Riverside School Study to assess the ethnic differences in measured intelligence that existed before desegregation and to explore whether desegregation affected these scores. In addition, this chapter examines the relation between IQ and other aspects of personality, academic achievement, and teacher attitudes. Before proceeding, however, we will present some of the past research so that our own findings can be viewed in perspective.

Keywords

White Child Black Child Achievement Score Minority Child Scholastic Achievement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman Miller
    • 1
  • Merle Linda Zabrack
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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