Direct Treatment of Sexual Dysfunction

  • Joseph LoPiccolo
Part of the Perspectives in Sexuality book series (PISE)

Abstract

The field of sex therapy is one in which practical applications have been much more emphasized than basic research. Paradoxically, sex therapy consists of a variety of procedures that are demonstrably effective, but the reasons for this effectiveness are not known. Thus, different therapists use very different theoretical viewpoints to “explain” why their sex therapy procedures work. In this chapter, an attempt is made to find the common elements in different sex therapy programs, and so arrive at a set of common basic principles of sex therapy. In addition, this chapter provides a brief overview and summary of the etiology and treatment of the common sexual dysfunctions that are more thoroughly discussed in other chapters of this volume.

Keywords

Fatigued Assure Beach Phenothiazine Fetishism 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph LoPiccolo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, School of MedicineState University of New YorkStony BrookUSA

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