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Spore Formation in Bacteria

  • John F. Peberdy

Abstract

four types of spores are produced by a number of representative groups of bacteria. The most widely studied are the endospores, which are found in three genera—Bacillus, Clostridium and Sporosarcina. Endospores are essentially dormant or resting cells and their formation does not represent a reproductive process. The same is true for cysts, although a cell producing cysts in fact gives rise to two. Cyst formation is a characteristic of the genus Azotobacter. Myxospores, produced by members of the Myxobacterates, are also resting cells. In contrast, their formation involves the differentiation of specialised spore-bearing structures but, even so, each spore is a product of a single bacterial cell. The only true spores, i. e. reproductive structures produced for dissemination and multiplication of the species, are the conidia, or arthrospores, produced by the Actinomycetes.

Keywords

Vegetative Cell Spore Formation Spore Wall Mature Spore Dipicolinic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© J.F.Peberdy 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • John F. Peberdy
    • 1
  1. 1.University of NottinghamUK

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