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Regulation of Adenosine Metabolism by 5’-Nucleotidases

  • John M. Lowenstein
  • Ming-Kun Yu
  • Yoshitsugo Naito
Part of the Developments in Pharmacology book series (DIPH, volume 2)

Abstract

When an organ is subjected to anoxia or an increased work load, its rates of A TP utilization and synthesis change. Such changes are accompanied by adjustments in the concentrations of many intermediates of energy metabolism, including ATP, ADP, AMP, creatine phosphate, and creatine. However, changes in the concentration of free A TP are relatively small.

Keywords

Adenylate Kinase Nucleotidase Activity Adenosine Production Increase Work Load Adenosine Metabolism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Lowenstein
  • Ming-Kun Yu
  • Yoshitsugo Naito

There are no affiliations available

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