Poxviruses

  • Yechiel Becker
  • Julia Hadar

Abstract

Poxviruses are the largest viruses among the members of Taxa A and B. The virions that replicate in the host cell cytoplasm contain a double-stranded DNA genome of 130–240 × 106 daltons and more than 30 proteins, including an enzyme, a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The virion proteins elicit antibodies to at least 10 antigens. One antigen is common to all the members of this virus family.

Keywords

Fermentation Mold Adenosine Polypeptide Interferon 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yechiel Becker
    • 1
  • Julia Hadar
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Virology Institute of Microbiology, Faculty of MedicineHebrew University of JerusalemIsrael

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