The Oliquric Neonate

  • Eddie S. Moore
  • Martina S. Evans
  • Craig B. Langman
Chapter
Part of the Developments in Nephrology book series (DINE, volume 6)

Abstract

Recent improvements in medical and nursing care of the newborn infant have resulted in a significant decrease in infant morbidity as well as mortality. In the main, these improvements have been technological with development of sophisticated monitoring devices and expansion of nursing care to that of clinician/practitioner with independent but supervised diagnostic and treatment skills. The latter has greatly enhanced successful implementation of improved monitoring technology. Despite technological advances, high-level care of the newborn infant requires continued use of traditional data gathering skills by history taking and physical assessment. Evaluation of the neonate with apparent oliguria is a classic example of the need to merge traditional techniques with current technology.

Keywords

Hydration Filtration Ischemia Urea Creatinine 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Boston 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eddie S. Moore
    • 1
  • Martina S. Evans
    • 1
  • Craig B. Langman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics and Nursing, Michael Reese HospitalUniversity of Chicago Pritzker School of MedicineChicagoUSA

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