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Development of Social Avoidance in Autistic Children

  • John Richer
Part of the Ettore Majorana International Science Series book series (SYLI)

Abstract

Numerous difficulties face anyone trying to study the early development of autistic children. The main ones are as follows:-
  • Delay in diagnosis. Although early infantile autism has its onset before a child is about 2½ years old, it is rarely diagnosed then. From the time parents first feel concerned about their child, they often have to wait a further one or more years until a diagnosis is made. Ornitz et al (1977) found that 50% of the families they interviewed were concerned about their child by the time it was 14 months, but that the median age of referral for diagnosis was 46 months, a delay of over 2½ years. Thus by the time the child is diagnosed, not only is the early history inevitably in the past, but if asked to recall early behaviour and events, the parent has to remember much further back.

Keywords

Avoidance Behaviour Autistic Child Social Approach Social Avoidance Autistic Behaviour 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Richer
    • 1
  1. 1.Paediatrics DepartmentJohn Radcliffe HospitalOxfordEngland

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