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Modulation of Immunological Reactivity by the Fc Piece of Immunoglobulin

  • William O. Weigle
  • Edward L. Morgan
  • Marilyn L. Thoman

Abstract

Although the specific reactivities of antibodies are restricted to the variable regions located in the Fab portions of the molecule, the biological functions of these proteins are governed by the Fc region of the molecule. In addition to opsonization, complement fixation, placental transfer, metabolism of the intact molecule and anaphylaxis, the Fc region is responsible for immune regulation by antibody and antigen-antibody complexes (reviewed in Ref. 1). It is well documented that passive antibody can modulate the immune response to a subsequent injection of specific antigen2–11. This modulation may be in the form of either enhancement or suppression, depending on the antibody-antigen ratios. Pre-formed complexes injected directly into animals have also been reported to modulate the specific response to the antigen. Although extremely large amounts of antibody given either in the form of complexes or free antibody appears to suppress the immune response by masking antigenic determinants and sequestering them from the immune system5,8 more physiological doses of antibody modulate the immune response through an active process in which the Fc fragment of the antibody is an absolute requirement3,6.

Keywords

Proliferative Response Immunological Reactivity Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction Mouse Spleen Cell Polyclonal Activation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • William O. Weigle
    • 1
  • Edward L. Morgan
    • 1
  • Marilyn L. Thoman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ImmunopathologyScripps Clinic and Research FoundationLa JollaUSA

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