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Chemicals as Environmental Mutagens and Carcinogens

  • B. Singer
  • D. Grunberger

Abstract

There has been a constant and dramatic increase in the number of chemicals synthesized and encountered in the environment. However, in spite of new chemicals accruing at the rate of 6000 per week, the number of chemicals in “common use” is estimated to be about 65,000 (of the greater than 4,000,000 known) and the number of chemicals for which there is evidence of carcinogenicity is remarkably small.

Keywords

Cold Spring Harbor Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Human Carcinogen Environmental Mutagen Human Risk Assessment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Singer
    • 1
  • D. Grunberger
    • 2
  1. 1.University of California at BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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