Primary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease

  • M. Kornitzer
Part of the Ettore Majorana International Science Series book series (SIPC)

Abstract

Atherosclerosis or better said atherothrombosis is the pathological basis for coronary heart disease (C.R.D.). Autopsy studies have shown a correlation between the prevalence of atherothrombotic complicated lesions and coronary mortality at the population level. On the other hand correlations between complicated lesions and the major coronary risk factors like hypercholesterolemia, high blood pressure or smoking have also been observed.

Keywords

Placebo Cholesterol Obesity Nicotine Heparin 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Kornitzer
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Epidemiology and Social MedicineFree University of Brussels Campus Erasme - CP 590BrusselsBelgium

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