The Mechanical Properties of Stainless Steel Castings at 4 K

  • T. A. Whipple
  • H. I. McHenry

Abstract

The limited use of stainless steel castings for 4-K service is partially due to the limited data available on their mechanical properties at 4 K.1 The most significant 4-K data available on the tensile and fracture toughness properties of stainless steel castings came from a series of CF8 centrifugal castings with varying delta-ferrite contents.1,2 There were six heats from three different vendors with delta-ferrite contents ranging from 0 to 14.5 percent. The results generally showed an increase in strength and a decrease in fracture toughness with increasing ferrite content.

Keywords

Nickel Chromium Ferrite Austenite Helium 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. A. Whipple
    • 1
  • H. I. McHenry
    • 1
  1. 1.Fracture and Deformation DivisionNational Bureau of StandardsBoulderUSA

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