Pharmacogenetic Approaches to the Neuropharmacology of Ethanol

  • Dennis R. Petersen
Part of the Recent Developments in Alcoholism book series (RDIA, volume 1)

Abstract

The literature cited in this review clearly demonstrates that many of the behavioral and pharmacological responses to either acute or chronic actions of alcohol are indeed heritable. This conclusion is supported by data derived from several different animal models that have been genetically manipulated to display a wide variety of alcohol-related responses. It is doubtful if any one specific animal model will be developed that will serve as a prototype for human alcoholism. When one considers the amount of knowledge resulting from the pharmacogenetic studies reviewed here, it is more likely that major advances in our understanding of alcohol’s complex actions will be derived from several different animal models.

Keywords

Toxicity Depression Covariance Recombination Aldehyde 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis R. Petersen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.School of PharmacyInstitute for Behavioral GeneticsUSA
  2. 2.Alcohol Research CenterUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA

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