Advertisement

On the Interaction of Stress with the Martensitic Phase Transition in A15 Compounds

  • D. O. Welch
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials book series (ACRE, volume 28)

Abstract

Recently there has been a resurgence of interest in the effect of the martensitic phase transition that occurs in many A15 compounds1 on superconductivity2 and on elastic and anelastic behavior.3 Since in many practical applications, A15 compounds are subject to considerable stress and strain, it is of interest to examine the interaction of stress with the martensitic transition; this paper is an examination of the effects of stress predicted by a simple Landau model, which successfully describes many features of the transition, and the related temperature dependence of the elastic modulus (d11 − c12)/2.1 Earlier, Pietrass4 discussed some of the effects of stress on the phase transition in the context of a Landau model, and the present paper is an extension and development of this theoretical approach. We focus on the effect of stress on the temperature ranges of stability and metastability of various types of martensitic domain and briefly discuss the non-linearity of the stress-strain relation in a polycrystalline A15.

Keywords

Composite Conductor Landau Model Spontaneous Strain Martensitic Phase Transition Ferroelastic Domain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    M. Weger and I. B. Goldberg, in: “Solid State Physics,” Vol. 28, F. Seitz and D. Turnbull, eds., Academic Press, New York (1973), p. 1.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    R. Flükiger, Phase relationships, basic metallurgy, and superconducting properties of Nb3Sn and related compounds, in: “Advances in Cryogenic Engineering - Materials,” Vol. 28, Plenum Press, New York (1982), p. 399.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    J. F. Bussie re, B. Faucher, C. L. Snead, Jr., and D. O. Welch, Phys. Rev. B (in press).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    B. Pietrass, Phys. Status Solidi b 68: 553 (1975).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    H. B. Huntington, in: “Solid State Physics,” Vol. 7, F. Seitz and D. Turnbull, eds., Academic Press, New York (1958), p. 213.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. O. Welch
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Metallurgy and Materials ScienceBrookhaven National LaboratoryUptonUSA

Personalised recommendations