A Behavioral Analysis of the Reinforcing Properties of Alcohol and Other Drugs in Man

  • Nancy K. Mello

Abstract

Alcohol, opiates, and cocaine are among the first drugs used by man, both as medicines and to induce changes in states of consciousness. Through the centuries, an intricate tapestry of legend and belief has been woven about each drug, its origins, and its effects. Yet, today our understanding of the behavioral consequences of drug intoxication is surprisingly limited. Clinical studies of individuals during intoxication have gradually begun to reveal an evanescent and complex panorama of drug effects which often encompasses both joy and pain, euphoria and despondency. No precise metric yet exists to predict which of the myriad effects on this continuum will occur following a particular drug dose at a particular time.

Keywords

Placebo Fatigue Caffeine Smoke Androgen 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy K. Mello
    • 1
  1. 1.Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research CenterHarvard Medical School—McLean HospitalBelmontUSA

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