Home-Based Early Intervention

  • Edward E. Gotts

Abstract

The problems of delivering human services in rural areas are multiple: physical isolation, poor roads, and nonexistent public transportation; scarcity of resources and services; remoteness from institutions of higher education and medical centers. In addition, apathy, indifference, and opposition—products of rural people’s perception that new ideas and procedures may disturb or destroy traditional values and patterns of living—are pervasive. Finally, there is a history of neglect of rural needs by state and federal officials who have been decidedly more responsive to the needs of urban communities. These problems, described in detail in Chapter 12, are magnified in much of rural Appalachia because of its mountainous topography, sparse population, severe poverty, and traditional culture.

Keywords

Depression Transportation Income Assure Sonal 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward E. Gotts
    • 1
  1. 1.Appalachia Educational LaboratoryCharlestonUSA

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