Lasting Effects After Preschool

  • Richard B. Darlington

Abstract

The Consortium for Longitudinal Studies was formed in 1975. In that year a group of early childhood investigators who had independently conducted experimental infant and preschool programs for low-income children in the 1960s began a series of meetings chaired by Irving Lazar of Cornell University. Originally named the Consortium for Developmental Continuity, the group included: E. Kuno Beller, Temple University; Martin and Cynthia Deutsch, New York University; Ira Gordon, deceased September, 1978; Susan Gray, George Peabody College; Merle Karnes, University of Illinois; Phyllis Levenstein, Verbal Interaction Project; Louise Miller, University of Louisville; Francis Palmer, Merrill-Palmer Institute; David Weikart, High/Score Foundation; Myron Woolman, Institute for Educational Research; and Edward Zigler, Yale University.

Keywords

Boulder Cove Reten 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard B. Darlington
    • 1
  1. 1.Cornell UniversityUSA

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