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Stimulating Hardware and Software Support for Interval Arithmetic

  • G. William Walster
Part of the Applied Optimization book series (APOP, volume 3)

Abstract

Commercial hardware and software system suppliers do not yet include support for interval arithmetic in their products. In this paper, the reasons for this lack of support are described. Based on these descriptions, recommendations are made to help stimulate end-user demand and commercial support for interval arithmetic.

Keywords

Interval Arithmetic Floating Point Application Developer Interval Method Float Point Arithmetic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. William Walster
    • 1
  1. 1.SunSoft, A Sun Microsystems, Inc. BusinessMountain ViewUSA

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