General Scales

  • Stanley L. Brodsky
  • H. O’Neal Smitherman
Part of the Perspectives in Law & Psychology book series (MPIE)

Abstract

In the search for crime-related scales, we uncovered hundreds of research studies conducted with scales developed for other purposes, then applied to offender or other justice populations. Our first inclination was to discard them; after all, they were not crime and delinquency specific. They had been used for studying neurotics, psychotics, slow learners, obese children, or other pathological subjects. Yet the frequency of their use suggested to us that they ought to be specifically called to the attention of crime and delinquency researchers. One further reason for including these measures was the simple time-investment issue. We had already gathered the listings and results of many such scales. For us, such an additional time investment was relatively short compared to the researcher who seeks out this information independently.

Keywords

Depression Income Tral Dine Kelly 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley L. Brodsky
    • 1
  • H. O’Neal Smitherman
    • 2
  1. 1.University of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA
  2. 2.Partlow State SchoolTuscaloosaUSA

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