Governmental Responsibilities in Genetic Diseases

  • Arno G. Motulsky

Abstract

All modern governments include among their responsibilites the protection of public health of their citizens. The term public health is often broadly drawn and includes the promotion of good medical care with access of the entire population to medical practitioners and hospitals. The specific measures that have given citizens of developed societies their current long life-span consisted largely of good hygiene, which cleaned up environmental contamination of water and milk and made available preventive immunization and antibiotic agents. These procedures, together with the provision of sufficient food to prevent malnutrition in the majority of the population, have led to better health of developed societies than was ever known previously in human history. With current attainments, however, we have not yet reached the optimum in good health. With the conquest of most infections and nutritional diseases, developed societies continue to face birth defects and genetic diseases as significant health problems.

Keywords

Schizophrenia Anemia Diarrhea Expense Lactose 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Motulsky, A. G., Genetic counseling, in: Cecil Textbook of Medicine (15th ed.) (P. B. Beeson, W. McDermott, and J. B. Wyngaarden, eds.), p. 56, Saunders, Philadelphia (1979).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Carter, C. O., Roberts, J. A. F., Evans, K. A., etal., Genetic clinic. Afollowup, Lancet 1: 281 (1971).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Murray, R. G., Jr., Public health perspective on screening and problems in counseling in sickle cell anemia, in: Genetics Issues in Public Health and Medicine (B. H. Cohen, A. M. Lilienfeld, and P. C. Huang, eds.), p. 264, Charles C Thomas, Springfield, 111. (1978).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kan, Y. W., Prenatal diagnosis of hemoglobin disorders, Prog. Hematol. 10: 91 (1977).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kan, Y. W., and Dozy, A. M., Antenatal diagnosis of sickle-cell anemia by DNA analysis of amniotic fluid cells, Lancet 2: 910 (1978).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Motulsky, A. G., Postdoctoral education and training in medical genetics, in: Service and Education in Medical Genetics (I. H. Porter and E. B. Hook, eds.), p. 409, Academic Press, New York (1979).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Inman, R. P., Editorial, On the benefits and costs of genetic screening, Am. J. Hum. Genet. 30: 219 (1978).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Nelson, W. B., Swint, J. M., and Caskey, C. T., A comment on the benefits and costs of genetic screening, Am. J. Hum. Genet. 30: 663 (1978).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Omenn, G. S., and Motulsky, A. G., “Ego-genetics”: Genetic variation in susceptibility to environmental agents, in: Genetic Issues in Public Health and Medicine (B. H. Cohen, A. M. Lilienfeld, and P. C. Huang, eds.), p. 83, Charles C Thomas, Springfield, 111. (1978).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Motulsky, A. G., Bioethical problems in pharmacogenetics and ecogenetics, Hum. Genet. (Suppl.) 1: 185 (1978).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Committee on a Study of National Needs for Biomedical and Behavioral Research Personnel (National Research Council), Personnel Needs and Training for Biomedical and Behavioral Research, 1978 Report, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C. (1978).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arno G. Motulsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Inherited DiseasesUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

Personalised recommendations