Polluted Rain pp 259-272 | Cite as

Vegetation Surfaces: A Platform for Pollutant/Parasite Interactions

  • D. S. Shriner
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH)

Abstract

Above-ground surfaces of higher plants are the site of deposition of a variety of airborne biological materials and atmospheric pollutants. These biological materials (pollen, fungal spores, bacterial cells, waste from insect feeding) and the pollutants (as aerosols, gases, or dissolved in rain) may interact to influence the host plant, the pathogen, or the host/pathogen association. The conditions of the plant’s surface environments can affect the behavior of a pathogen and alter the chemical characteristics of throughfall or stemflow originating at those surfaces. Host-pathogen interactions represent a sensitive indicator of plant stress, since the changes in balance between host and parasite may reveal a subtle abiotic stress long before the response would be detectable in the healthy plant alone. The impact of wet and dry deposition of pollutant materials on the plant surface alone, and on potentially pathogenic organisms, is necessary in order to fully interpret many plant:parasite interactions. This paper discusses examples of pollutant-parasite interactions at the leaf surface to illustrate the role that pollutants can play in the relationship of susceptible host and virulent pathogen.

Keywords

Dioxide Corn Dust Carbide Ozone 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. S. Shriner
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Sciences DivisionOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA

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