Auxin-Regulated Cell Enlargement: Is there Action at the Level of Gene Expression?

  • Larry N. Vanderhoef
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (volume 29)

Abstract

Auxin has been studied for fifty years as a regulating hormone in many developmental phenomena (1). Much of this work has been devoted to its effect on cell enlargement (2–6); however, our accumulated knowledge of auxin-regulated cell enlargement does not include an understanding of its primary mode of action. During the past two decades two hypotheses have, in turn, dominated and directed experimentation designed to solve this problem. In the 1960’s the “gene expression” hypothesis of Key, and others (4) was popularly accepted. In the early 1970’s, however, a new hypothesis, the “wall acidification” (7) hypothesis of Rayle and Cleland (5) and Hager et al. (8), was proposed, and it now directs the thinking of many researchers in this area. It is generally presumed that the tenets of these two hypotheses are incompatible.

Keywords

Corn Estrogen Progesterone Defend Cycloheximide 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry N. Vanderhoef
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BotanyUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA

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