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Lithium and Acetylcholine Interactions

  • D. S. Janowsky
  • A. Abrams
  • S. McCunney
  • G. Groom
  • L. L. Judd

Abstract

It has been proposed that affective disorders may be regulated by a complex balance between adrenergic and cholinergic factors, with depression being a disease of cholinergic predominance and mania being the converse (Janowsky et al., 1972a). As reviewed elsewhere (Janowsky et al., 1972a), much psychopharmacologic information supports this possibility, including the observation that effective antidepressant treatments such as the tricyclic antidepressants and ECT generally increase adrenergic activity and decrease cholinergic activity. Conversely, two effective antimanic agents, reserpine and haloperidol, increase cholinergic activity, and drugs which cause depression, such as reserpine and propranolol, have cholinergic, as well as antiadrenergic properties.

Keywords

Lithium Chloride Cholinergic Mechanism Adrenergic Activity Gnawing Behavior Methylphenidate Hydrochloride 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. S. Janowsky
    • 1
  • A. Abrams
    • 1
  • S. McCunney
  • G. Groom
    • 1
  • L. L. Judd
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California at San Diego, School of MedicineLa JollaUSA

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