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Luteinizing Hormone Releasing Hormone Analog Agonists in the Treatment of Advanced Prostatic Cancer

  • John Trachtenberg
  • Joseph A. SmithJr.
Part of the Cancer Treatment and Research book series (CTAR, volume 19)

Abstract

The treatment of advanced prostatic cancer is based upon the belief that this tumor is initially androgen dependent [1]. Therapeutic modalities therefore attempt to lower the level of circulating androgens. The two major clinical methods of achieving this aim are bilateral orchiectomy and the administration of pharmacologic doses of estrogens. While both techniques are effective in diminishing the level of circulating androgens and in inducing a remission in the majority of patients they both are associated with distinct clinical problems [2].

Keywords

Prostatic Cancer Luteinizing Hormone Advanced Prostatic Cancer Luteinizing Hormone Release Hormone Luteinizing Hormone Release 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Boston 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Trachtenberg
  • Joseph A. SmithJr.

There are no affiliations available

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