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Stress at Work: A Review of Australian Research

  • Robert Spillane

Abstract

If we consider stress to refer to a broad class of problems concerned with demands which tax the human system — the physiological and psychological systems — then stress research has a long history in Australia. Bernard Muscio (1971), for example, lectured under the auspices of the Workers’ Educational Association in 1916 on occupational selection, scientific management and work fatigue. The study of fatigue at work is a recurring theme in business publications and research papers between 1910 and 1930. During the 1930s psychologists studied the effects of time and motion techniques, training, rest pauses, changes in layout or work and executive stress (Marshall and Trahair, 1981). Since 1945 psychologists and sociologists have been particularly active in the field of occupational stress to the extent that in the 1980s stress rates as a prominent factor in industrial relations.

Keywords

Trade Union Industrial Relation Occupational Stress Noradrenaline Level Migrant Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Spillane
    • 1
  1. 1.Management Studies CentreMarquarie UniversityNorth RydeAustralia

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