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Tissue Response to Implants (Biocompatibility)

  • Joon Bu Park
Chapter

Abstract

In order to implant a material, we first have to injure the tissue. The injured or diseased tissues will be removed to some extent in the process of implantation. The success of the entire operation depends on the kind and degree of tissue response (biocompatibility) toward the implants during the healing process. The tissue response toward the injury may vary widely according to the site, species, contamination, etc. However, the inflammatory reaction and cellular response toward the wound for both intentional and accidental injuries are the same regardless of the site.

Keywords

Bone Cement Tissue Reaction Tissue Response Injured Site Spongy Bone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joon Bu Park
    • 1
  1. 1.College of EngineeringUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA

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