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Strength and Strengthening Mechanisms

  • Joon Bu Park

Abstract

The strength of a material depends on various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Although the most important is the chemical composition, the properties can be manipulated by altering the structure. Various mechanical, thermal, and surface treatments are used to create the desired balance of strength, hardness, and ductility. This chapter explains structure-property relationships and strengthening mechanisms for metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites.

Keywords

Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Slip Plane Screw Dislocation Edge Dislocation Acetate Polyvinyl 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joon Bu Park
    • 1
  1. 1.College of EngineeringUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA

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