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Characterization of Materials

  • Joon Bu Park
Chapter
  • 162 Downloads

Abstract

The physical characterization or properties required of a material for medical applications vary widely according to the particular application. Moreover, due to our imperfect understanding of tissue-material interactions, it is difficult if not impossible to translate the values of physicochemical properties of materials intoin vivoperformances. However, this should not prevent us from a thorough investigation of the characteristics of materialsin vitrobefore using them as implants. On the contrary, the study of implant materials must start from a basic understanding of the behavior of materials under various conditions. In this chapter, we will try to limit our study by focusing attention on the basic elements of material characterizations.

Keywords

Natural Rubber Ductile Material Maxwell Model Tertiary Creep Corrosive Wear 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joon Bu Park
    • 1
  1. 1.College of EngineeringUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA

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